Repatriation of American Indian remains.

Cover of: Repatriation of American Indian remains. |

Published by American Indian Studies Center, University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, Calif .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Antiquities -- Law and legislation.,
  • Indians of North America -- Antiquities -- Religious aspects.,
  • Indians of North America -- Funeral customs and rites.,
  • Exhumation -- Law and legislation -- United States.,
  • Burial laws -- United States.

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesAmerican Indian Culture and Research Journal.
ContributionsUniversity of California, Los Angeles. American Indian Studies Center.
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 268 p. ;
Number of Pages268
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14096952M

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U of Nebraska Press, Oct 1, - History - pages 0 Reviews In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for. Synopsis of Repatriation Reader: Who Owns American Indian Remains?.

In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the. Repatriation Reader: Who Owns American Indian Remains.

- Ebook written by Devon Abbott Mihesuah. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Repatriation Reader: Who Owns American Indian Remains?. Product Information.

In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the relationship between Native communities and archaeologists.

In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the relationship between Native communities and archaeologists/5.

Appendix: Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Summary In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the.

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee Repatriation of American Indian remains. book charged with facilitating the resolution of disputes among lineal descendants, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, museums, and federal agencies relating to the return of human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony.

Native American Graves Protection & Repatriation Act. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act ofor NAGPRA, provides a process for federal agencies and museums that receive federal funds to repatriate or transfer from their collections certain Native American cultural items -- human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony -- to.

InCongress passed the landmark Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). NAGPRA instituted guidelines for the respectful return of Native American human remains and cultural objects Repatriation of American Indian remains.

book any collection (museum, university, government, etc.) that received federal funding. Grave Injustice is the powerful story of the ongoing struggle of Native Americans to repatriate the objects and remains of their ancestors that were appropriated, collected, manipulated, sold, and displayed by Europeans and Americans.

Anthropologist Kathleen S. Fine-Dare focuses on the history and culture of both the impetus to collect and the movement to repatriate Native American remains. Buy a cheap copy of Repatriation Reader: Who Owns American book by Devon A.

Mihesuah. In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural Free shipping over $   For decades, Native American groups requested the return of artifacts and human remains.

Though there were occasional repatriations, the protests either fell. Get this from a library. Repatriation reader: who owns American Indian remains?. [Devon A Mihesuah;] -- In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing.

In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the relationship between Native communities and archaeologists.

In this unprecedented volume, Native Americans and Brand: Nebraska Paperback. The authors of Ubelaker and Guttenplan Grantboth at the Smithsonian, discuss issues with the repatriation of human remains; it is especially important because the repatriation movement of the mid- to late s targeted NMNH’s large number of Native American human remains.

A variety of sometimes explosive case studies are considered, ranging from Kennewick Man to the repatriation of Zuni Ahayu:da. Also featured is a detailed discussion of the background, meaning, and applicability of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation.

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), Pub. 25 U.S.C. et seq., Stat.is a United States federal law enacted on 16 November The Act requires federal agencies and institutions that receive federal funding to return Native American "cultural items" to lineal descendants and culturally affiliated Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian.

(CBS/AP) — On Thursday, President Donald Trump announced the repatriation of Native American remains and artifacts taken from Colorado years ago. A Swedish researcher unearthed the remains.

Date: Thursday, Sept. 17, Contact: [email protected] WASHINGTON – Last year, President Trump and President Niinistӧ of Finland finalized an agreement to return American Indian ancestral remains and funerary objects taken over a century ago from what is now Mesa Verde National Park inU.S.

Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt, Assistant. With the Repatriation Project, the Association on American Indian Affairs (AAIA) has built a national and international effort assisting Indian Nations, Tribes and communities in the United States with domestic and international repatriation.

AAIA has been a national leader advocating for the repatriation of ancestral remains, burial items, sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony for. Maria Pearson. Maria Pearson is often credited with being the earliest catalyst for the passage of NAGPRA legislation; she has been called “the Founding Mother of modern Indian repatriation movement” and the “Rosa Parks of NAGPRA”.

[8] In the early s, Pearson was appalled that the skeletal remains of Native Americans were treated differently from white remains.

Repatriation is the process whereby specific kinds of American Indian cultural items in a museum collection are returned to lineal descendants and culturally affiliated Indian tribes, Alaska Native clans or villages, and/or Native Hawaiian organizations.

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT REPATRIATION. Inthe Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) was passed by Congress to address the rights of Native American tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations to the human remains, and sacred funerary objects of their ancestors.

Repatriation and the disposition of the dead At the close of the 20th century, public good rationales became particularly heated in relation to the disposition of the indigenous dead: most Native Americans felt that graves of any type should be left intact and found the practice of collecting human remains for study fundamentally repulsive.

Today on Stateside, a Michigan official responds to the controversy surrounding Wisconsin’s quiet approval of a request to divert nearly 11 million gallons of Great Lakes water per day. Plus, a comic book that explores the repatriation of Native American remains and the relationship between indigenous tribes and museums.

Repatriation Roundtable Discussion. Wednesday, November 3, 5 to p.m. Park Library Auditorium. Dennis Banks, co-founder of the American Indian Movement, and others who work at the national level to address Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act issues discussed the repatriation of Native American remains from CMU's museum.

“The university understands the need for a stronger policy to better effectuate repatriation of Native American human remains and cultural items, and to improve our relationships with Native. Thirty years after Congress passed the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, only a fraction of human remains held by.

The end of marks the twentieth anniversary of the passing of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) which requires federally funded museums to inventory their. The repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the relationship between Native This book offers views on repatriation and the ethical, political, legal.

REPATRIATION OF NATIVE AMERICAN HUMAN REMAINS AND CULTURAL MATERIALS Introduction This policy governs the repatriation of Native American human remains, funerary objects (associated and unassociated), sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony as set forth in: the National Museum of the American Indian Act, 20 U.S.C.

§80q (Public Law. Today is the 30th anniversary of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). To date 60% (at least k ancestors' remains) of ancestors held by museums, universities, and other institutions have still not be returned to tribes for reburial.

The artefacts in question included the ancestral remains and 28 funerary objects, which hold great cultural and spiritual significance for the descendants of the Pueblo tribes. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of grants descendants the right to reclaim human remains and sacred objects.

The remains came under review as a result of Warren’s ongoing research on its collections required by the federal Native American Graves Repatriation Act (). P.M. EDT. THE PRESIDENT: Okay, thank you very much for being here as we commemorate the return of historic Native American artifacts and sacred remains to American soil.

HIST – The Living Dead Litaker – Spring Repatriation of Native American Remains: Contrasting Views This week we will be learning about the treatment of Native American remains over the course of U.S.

history, their use for research and display and the movement to repatriate these bodies Native American tribes. In your assigned materials for the week, you will encounter a variety. The act describes the rights that both lineal descendants and native groups have with regard to the treatment, repatriation, and disposition of Native American human remains, funerary objects.

After many long years of protest and political action, Congress passed the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, or NAGPRA, in This legislation required federal agencies and other institutions that received federal money, such as museums, to account for the human remains, funerary and sacred objects, and objects of.

What is NAGPRA?. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act is a Federal law passed in NAGPRA provides a process for museums and Federal agencies to return certain Native American cultural items -- human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony -- to lineal descendants, Indian tribes, and Native Hawaiian organizations.

Repatriation of Native American Artifacts and Remains (September ) Remarks by President Trump on the Repatriation of Native American Artifacts and Remains (Septem ) Press Release: Native American Ancestral Remains Repatriated from the National Museum of Finland to Mesa Verde National Park (Septem ).

Law on the Books: I. Content of the Law: The Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act ofalso known as (NAGPRA), prohibits museums, scientists, and other federal agencies from keeping ancestral remains and artifacts belonging to Native American tribes.

NAGPRA (25 U.S.C. § et seq.) ensures proper possession towards Native American artifacts through .Devon Mihesuah, ed. The Repatriation Reader: Who Owns American Indian Remains? (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, ); and Kathleen Fine-Dare, Grave Injustice: The American Indian Repatriation Movement and NAGPRA (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, ).

Sangita Chari and Jaime M. N. Lavallee, eds., Accomplishing NAGPRA: Perspectives on the Intent, Impact, and Future. No, we are in the USA and these are the effects of NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act). NAGPRA, a federal law that enables Native American tribes to prevent excavations and to rebury skeletal remains regardless of their .

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