Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain a comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations

Cover of: Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain |

Published by M. Nijhoff, Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers in Dordrecht, Boston, Hingham, MA, USA .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Brain -- Anatomy -- Atlases.,
  • Brain -- Tomography -- Atlases.

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementby C. Plets ... [et al.].
SeriesSeries in radiology ;, 13
ContributionsPlets, C.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQM455 .C586 1987
The Physical Object
Pagination111 p. :
Number of Pages111
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2715485M
ISBN 100898388112
LC Control Number86008525

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Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human Brain A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations. Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human Brain: A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations (Series in Radiology) th Edition by C.

Plets (Author), A. Baert (Author), G.L. Nijs (Author), Guido Wilms (Author) & 1 moreAuthors: A. Baert, C. Plets, G.L. Nijs. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by : EH Burrows.

@article{osti_, title = {Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain: A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations}, author = {Plets, C and Baert, A L and Nijs, G L and Wilms, G}, abstractNote = {It is of the greatest importance to the radiologist, the neurologist and the neurosurgeon to be able to localize.

Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human Brain; Email alerts. Article Text. Article menu. Article Text; Article info; Citation Tools; Share; Responses; Article metrics; Alerts; PDF.

Book review. Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human : EH Burrows. Author(s): Plets,C Title(s): Computer tomographic imaging and anatomic correlation of the human brain: a comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations/ C.

Plets. Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human Brain. Coronavirus: Find the latest articles and preprints Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human Brain. Burrows E. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry,   Computer Tomographic Imaging and Anatomic Correlation of the Human Brain: A comparative atlas of thin CT-scan sections and correlated neuro-anatomic preparations - Series in Radiology 13 (Hardback) C.

Plets (author), A. Baert (author), G.L. Nijs (author), Guido Wilms (author) Sign in to write a review £Book Edition: Ed. The atlas, Imaging Anatomy of the Human Brain by Borden, Forseen, and Stefan is a very fine and detailed anatomic atlas of the skull, brain, cranial nerves, and intracranial vessels, as seen through modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomographic (CT) imaging techniques.

After a rather brief, but very much didactic introductory text about the encephalic development and its. The anatomy in these color illustrations mirror the black and white anatomic MR images presented in this atlas.

Written by two neuroradiologists and an anatomist who are also prominent educators, along with more than a dozen contributors, the atlas begins with a brief introduction to the development, organization, and function of the human brain.

The volume provides a unique review of the essential topographical anatomy of the brain from an MRI perspective, correlating high-quality anatomical plates with the corresponding high-resolution MRI images.

The book includes a historical review of brain mapping and an analysis of the essential reference planes used for the study of the human brain. Provides detailed views of anatomic structures within and around the human brain utilizing over 1, high quality images across a broad range of imaging modalities Contains extensively labeled images of all regions of the brain and adjacent areas that can be compared and contrasted across modalitiesReviews: 2.

Source: Terese Winslow. The term “computed tomography”, or CT, refers to a computerized x-ray imaging procedure in which a narrow beam of x-rays is aimed at a patient and quickly rotated around the body, producing signals that are processed by the machine’s computer to generate cross-sectional images—or “slices”—of the body.

Neuromelanin-sensitive MRI (NM-MRI) purports to detect the content of neuromelanin (NM), a product of dopamine metabolism that accumulates in the substantia nigra (SN).

Prior work has shown that NM-MRI provides a marker of SN integrity in Parkinson’s disease. Here, we show that it may additionally provide a marker of dopamine function in the human nigrostriatal pathway. Atlas of Gastrointestinal Imaging: Radiological-Endoscopic Correlation Article in Colorectal Disease 10(8) October with 25 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomographic, and positron emission tomographic studies of the brain provide complementary information, and many patients undergo more than one of these studies during the course of their diagnostic workup and treatment.

Get this from a library. Human brain anatomy in computerized images. [Hanna Damasio] -- "Spectacular recent developments in neuroimaging technologies have vastly increased the amount of information about brain structure that can be obtained from tomographic scans.

Prepared by a leading. Panetta, in Comprehensive Biomedical Physics, Abstract. Computed tomography (CT) is a diagnostic technique that allows reconstructing cross sections of a patient's body, providing detailed information about structure and anatomy of organs and, to some extent, also of their functionality.

Magnetic resonance imaging methods have taken a commanding position in brain studies because they allow scientists to follow brain activities in the living human. The ability to measure cerebral anatomy, neuronal firing, and brain metabolism has extended and re-invigorated hopes of understanding the role that brain activity plays in human life.

Computer tomographic localization, lesion size and prognosis in aphasia and nonverbal impairment. Brain and Language, 8, 34– PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar. The anatomy in these color illustrations mirror the black and white anatomic MR images presented in this atlas.

Written by two neuroradiologists and an anatomist who are also prominent educators, along with more than a dozen contributors, the atlas begins with a brief introduction to the development, organization, and function of the human s: 2.

Andrew B. Newberg, Abass Alavi, in Reference Module in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Psychology, Abstract. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a widely available and flexible imaging technique that is capable of visualizing and quantifying changes in cerebral blood flow and neurotransmitter systems.

SPECT, in addition to newer SPECT-CT, scanners are an important tool. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1–2 mm and with 10–50 different tissue types resolved.

We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named “MIDA”. Powerful new imaging techniques have supported and made possible the recent emphasis on the anatomical substrates of emotion. 76 The most impressive techniques are computer assisted tomography (CAT scans), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET scans), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

human head. It is the purpose of this paper to show the usefulness of this approach both for education and clinical work. Materials and Methods Basic Data The basic idea is to describe the anatomy in two levels (Fig.

The lower level is a volume data set from cross­ sectional imaging such as MR imaging and/ or CT (pictorial level). Applying ultrasonic imaging system during surgery requires the poring of saline, performing the measurement, and acquiring data from its display—which requires time and is highly “performer dependent,” i.e., the measure is of a subjective nature.

A new ultrasonic device was recently developed that overcomes most of these drawbacks and was successfully applied during tumor-in-brain. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) was used to identify candidate language processing areas in the intact human brain.

Language was defined broadly to include both phonological and lexical–semantic functions and to exclude sensory, motor, and general executive functions.

The language activation task required phonetic and semantic analysis of aurally presented words and was compared. History and Fundamentals.

Computed tomography (CT), also called computed axial tomography (CAT), was developed in the early s by Sir Geoffrey Hounsfield and his colleagues in England. 1 It was possibly the single most important advance in medical imaging since the discovery of x-rays by Professor Wilhelm Roentgen.

It represented the first commercially available imaging equipment that. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to form pictures of the anatomy and the physiological processes of the body.

MRI scanners use strong magnetic fields, magnetic field gradients, and radio waves to generate images of the organs in the body. MRI does not involve X-rays or the use of ionizing radiation, which distinguishes it from CT and PET scans.

As the volume of cross-sectional imaging studies continues to increase, radiologists are faced with mounting challenges to comprehensive and accurate image interpretation. As with most other anatomic imaging, interpretation of routine brain imaging studies is predisposed to its own unique set of commonly missed pathologic conditions.

two dimensional brain imaging. Using echo planar imaging two dimensional slice data can be acquired in 40 ms with an in plane anatomical resolution of about 1 mm. thus functional maps of the human brain can be obtained without ionizing radiation or the administration of exogenous contrast material.[2].

It uses imaging materials of preoperative MRI examinations, 3D sequences and DTI and fMRI data, that are transferred to a computer database of a neuronavigation device; which, after data processing and registering of the patient's head position, allows for planning of an optimal trajectory for operating on the brain tumour.

Author Summary By analogy with the road network, the human brain is defined both by its anatomy (the ‘roads’), that is, the way neurons are shaped, clustered together and connected to each others and its dynamics (the ‘traffic’): electrical and chemical signals of various types, shapes and strength constantly propagate through the brain to support its sensorimotor and cognitive.

Prepared by a leading expert in advanced brain-imaging techniques, this unique atlas is a guide to the localization of brain structures that illustrates the wide range of neuroanatomical variation. It is based on the analysis of 29 normal human brains obtained from three-dimensional reconstructions of magnetic resonance scans of living persons.

Purpose To explore the use of noninvasive functional imaging and “virtual” lesion techniques to study the neural mechanisms underlying motor speech disorders in Parkinson’s disease.

Here, we report the use of positron emission tomography (PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explain exacerbated speech impairment following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS.

Such physiologic cortical changes have been measured previously using conventional continuous wave (CW) illumination sources, but absolute quantitation was not possible (Villringer et al., ; Hoshi and Tamura, ; Kato et al., ; Maki et al., ), and tomographic imaging is more difficult without the selective deeper brain sampling.

• This study investigated the relationship between severity of auditory comprehension in Wernicke's aphasia and amount of temporal lobe damage within Wernicke's area (posterior two thirds of superior temporal gyrus region) as well as the total temporoparietal lesion size.

There was a highly. Vallabhaneni A, Wang T, He B: “Brain Computer Interface,” In He B (Ed): Neural Engineering, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers,He B: “Electrocardiographic Tomographic Imaging,” In He B (Ed): Modeling and Imaging of Bioelectric Activity – Principles and Applications, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, Paleoneurobiology is the study of brain evolution by analysis of brain endocasts to determine endocranial traits and volumes.

Considered a subdivision of neuroscience, paleoneurobiology combines techniques from other fields of study including paleontology and reveals specific insight concerning human cranium is unique in that it grows in response to the growth of.

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Beneath the cerebral lobes •Are the most sensitive brain structures. •Here lie areas responsible for moving short-term memory traces into long-term memory traces (the hypocampal area). •Also housed in this region is the diencephalon which helps the body maintain homeostasis.

•Of critical import to learning is the reticular activating system which helps with attention and concentration.Medical imaging is the technique and process of creating visual representations of the interior of a body for clinical analysis and medical intervention, as well as visual representation of the function of some organs or tissues ().Medical imaging seeks to reveal internal structures hidden by the skin and bones, as well as to diagnose and treat disease.

Brain imaging (neuroimaging) was invented in the s by Angelo Mosso, who devised a technique referenced as the 'human circulation balance.' This technique was able to assess how blood was redistributed throughout the brain as an individual experienced emotion and/or engaged in intellectual tasks.

It wasn't until the early s that a newer, improved brain imaging technique .

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